Jump to content
yossarian

Why I'm disappointed with Mandriva 2010.0

Recommended Posts

I did run the CD and it appears to have everything found on the live CDs including Gnome, KDE4, LXDE, OpenOffice, gimp etc.

 

OK, thanks, I didn't know that. Is it possible to make an upgrade with it? In Mandriva wiki it is described as "installable CD" (like live CD's and unlike Free DVD), but it's also mentioned there that it only runs LXDE, so maybe things changed. I'll try it next time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Is it possible to make an upgrade with it?

I don't recall if Free can do an upgrade. Sometimes I have poor results with upgrades, therefore I do my own form of 'upgrade', meaning I use rsync to backup /home/user/ then I do a clean fresh install, then restore some or all files to /home/user/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Free can do an upgrade, it's not dependent on version, but there are lots of things to take into consideration when doing upgrades.

 

First, any config files for new packages, are always saved as filename.conf.rpmnew where filename is relative to whatever the package is/was being upgraded. Secondly, profiles for Gnome/KDE can be problematic although the upgrade should take care of it. Also upgrades for more than one release gap are not supported and so are likely to be problematic. For example, 2009.0 and 2009.1 can be upgraded to 2010.0 but 2008.1 cannot because it's more than two step versions away. Of course, there's nothing to stop you doing 2008.1 to 2009.0 or 2009.1 and then 2010.0. I did an upgrade from Mandrake 10.0 to Mandrake 10.1 and then to Mandriva LE2005 ages ago and that was more problematic because of the severe changes between 10.0 and 10.1 but it worked with a lot of tweaking :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Errm ... my two cents:

 

There is IMHO no real need to upgrade from one release to the next, especially if the hardware might not be fully supported anymore. My laptop is also rather old and it failed to install Mandriva 2010 - thus it still runs with Mandriva 2009 spring. My mother and my dad still run Mandriva 2008.1 and 2008.0 respectively and are happy with it. Rock-stable, no problems, now that they have all patches applied.

 

My desktop currently runs with Ubuntu - but that is because I am a bit lazy and have no interest right now to start all over again and test something different - and online-upgrading from release to release worked incredibly well, better than it ever did on my Mandy-boxes.:huh: If I'd reach the point, where an upgrade results in a buggy system, then I'd install an older release again - or perhaps CentOS or Debians Stable-branch. After all most apps we have today have all the basic funtionality we need and get mainly some cosmetic and usability improvements IMHO.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Ian and arctic.

 

I adopted your advice fully. I'm now writing this message from a formatted brand-new 2009.0 install. :)

 

Still, can anyone explain to me what is the dual-arch release and what it is good for? Just for general curiosity purposes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can only think that the dual arch release means it has the 32 bit and 64 bit version on the same disk that detects which one to install. But I could be wrong.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can only think that the dual arch release means it has the 32 bit and 64 bit version on the same disk that detects which one to install. But I could be wrong.

Correct but if you have a 64 bit processor you can over ride the default and install a 32 bit system.

 

It's also light weight, no KDE or Gnome desktop just LXDE and doesn't dump all kinds of garbage to your hard drive like the One CD does.

 

It's great for older/slow systems and those that only have a CD drive not DVD and can't boot from USB.

 

Ken

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I also have a computer with Intel 810 graphics. Note that this is antique hardware (667 MHz computer) which I got for free out of a local dumpster.

But I have a intel 915G card that uses the 810 graphics driver and I am working just fine

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

+1 for 2008.1 being a great version.

I tried to upgrade to 2009.1 but had the same problems with the Intel drivers as you guys - complete failure. Then I tried to install 2009.0 but had a different set of problems there - I should have stayed with 2008.1 as you said...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was provided with the Free-2010.0-Dual iso on disc for evaluation. The iso creates an install disc, not a Live CD. Auto-detection installed the 32-bit version on my Compaq Deskpro EN Pentium III 933 MHz 256 MB RAM with no problems. The apps provided by the install disc are very bare-bones, and no special considerations are given for dial-up users. GUI apps are very few in number: no gui text editor, no gui e-mail client, no gui multimedia sound app, no gui graphics app. The overall performance is amazingly fast, however, and it might be a good choice for someone with broadband access via a network card. I was forced to stay with PCLinuxOS 2009.4 LXDE, which has all essential extras on the Live CD, including wvdial for dial-up. I am very pleased with it thus far, but somewhat disappointed that Mandriva does not yet have an equivalent offering.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not sure what you were expecting.

 

I checked the PCLinuxOS web site and all I found was seven live CDs varying only in the desktop environment and as far as I could see all 32bit.

 

Mandriva offers two Free DVDs one 32bit and one 64bit and as you found the Dual Architecture CD.

 

For live CDs Mandriva offers 3 Gnome and 4 KDE CDs in order to cover as many languages as possible and still include as many programs as possible.

 

For Live CDs in different Desktops and architectures check

http://linuxtracker.org/

 

I see

 

One 64 Community 2010 0 KDE 4

One 64 Community 2010 0 GNOME

and

mandriva linux 2010 0 mud lxde edition V2

 

These are built by the community to add to what Mandriva has nether the time or money for.

 

Ken

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've just done my install using the I586 DVD, but don't recall having the option of copying the DVD to the hard disk. So as I set my system up I'm continually dropping the install DVD back in. Arrgh!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you've got an internet connection, set up easyurpmi sources :)

 

You can always copy the DVD manually and set it up to use that from the hard disk. I did this once.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you've got an internet connection, set up easyurpmi sources :)

 

You can always copy the DVD manually and set it up to use that from the hard disk. I did this once.

 

I do setup the easyurpmi sources, but why download when I have the release version on dvd? Especially when a download limit isn't so large. :(

 

Can I simply put this in my fstab file?

 

mount -o loop /path_to_iso/mandy2010.iso /mnt/2010_iso

 

Given the directory /mnt/2010_iso exists?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...