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Steve Scrimpshire

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About Steve Scrimpshire

  • Rank
    This is a dark ride
  • Birthday 02/13/1966

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  • Website URL
    http://semperphi.com/
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  • Location
    Mississippi - Home of 50,000 unused FEMA trailers and 20,000 homeless Katrina victims.
  1. According to this, it looks like this device is supported by SANE (for scanning). You need to install a front-end package along with libsane. I would suggest Xsane and/or Gimp for scanning. As for printing in color, you really shouldn't have a problem with it. It should print in color by default, but I would check the configuration (or buttons) of the printer itself.
  2. The content is great. Very thorough. I would make a small suggestion. I would move the "Warnings" section to the top of the article, right after the title and sub-title, to encourage it being read before attempting anything.
  3. You're welcome. A lot of the credit goes to aru. I just basically took his commands and turned them into a bash script.
  4. You've tried replacing the second one? How about both? kwin --replace && sh -c "cd ~/.Games/TitanAttacks && javaws titanattacks.jnlp" && compiz --replace &
  5. I've updated this script to not throw an error if your installation is not missing any files. I've attached the update script to this post. repair.zip
  6. shouldn't this be: Modify your LD_LIBRARY_PATH environment variable to contain the full path to the lib/<ARCH> directory. For example, on 32-bit Linux: export LD_LIBRARY_PATH=$LD_LIBRARY_PATH:/myhome/j3d/lib/i386 ?
  7. I'm not in Linux right now, but if I remember correctly, on Mandriva you would add that path to the /etc/ld.so.config file and then run ldconfig
  8. Or maybe: find . -name " - *.mp3" -exec sh -c 'mv ${0} "${0//\ \-\ / }"' {} \;
  9. Possibly...it could be your use of double quotes instead of single quotes, using the = instead of -eq, etc. Sorry, I forgot to look yesterday. Not sure you need the "" around the "$(wmctrl...". I think the case problem and the = sign did the trick...you might, though. What we really should do is grep -i gnumeric which makes the grep case-insensitive, in case they change it. Then I think you're good. Let me know if you do need the "" around "$(wmctrl..." and let me know if you need double instead of single quotes and all that. I guess my bash is rusty.
  10. When I get home today, I will check the syntax. It may be that you left off a space or I just missed a little something.
  11. I'm not at my linux box at the moment, but you might try something similar to this: wmctrl -s2 gnumeric filename1 & while [ $(wmctrl -l | grep gnumeric) -eq '' ] do sleep done wmctrl -s3 kpdf filename2 &
  12. Sorry about that. I lost a closing }. Add } on the very last line...you'll see I edited my post above to fix it.
  13. Ack. It's not the same command any more. You can copy this text to a file: #!/usr/bin/perl -w # rename - Larry's filename fixer $op = shift or die "Usage: rename expr [files]\n"; chomp(@ARGV = <STDIN>) unless @ARGV; for (@ARGV) { $was = $_; eval $op; die $@ if $@; rename($was,$_) unless $was eq $_; } And name it rename.pl, put it in your /usr/bin directory and chmod +x /usr/bin/rename.pl Then you can do: rename.pl 's/[0-9]+-//g' *
  14. There aren't a lot of examples, but I found one: http://tips.webdesign10.com/how-to-bulk-re...in-the-terminal Remove all underscores: rename -v 's/_/ /g' *.JPG Remove the numbers (and the dash): 01-test_rename_a 02-test_rename_b 03-test_rename_c rename -v 's/[0-9]+-//g' * If you want to remove the test_ part, too: rename -v 's/[0-9]+-test_//g' * I've been studying regexes for years and I still have a very limited understanding of them: http://www.cs.tut.fi/~jkorpela/perl/regexp.html
  15. mandri, That's pretty close to being exactly correct. The * is telling it to do this for all files in the directory. The "%%20" is the string to replace and " " is what to replace it with. " " is not exactly nothing, though. It's a space. The command is renaming all files that contain %%20, by using what they're named already, but replacing %%20 with a space. like%%20this becomes like this and%%20like%%20this becomes and like this
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