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Small but useful apps...

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I use Dropbox for synchronising files. You get 2GB for free, and if you recommend someone you both get an extra 250MB for free. So of course, pays to recommend :)

 

I have it installed on a number of machines, and my files get synchronised to the internet, encrypted when stored on the server (standard), and then when I turn on another computer, all the files are then synchronised to the next one. Or, if all machines are on at the same time, it happens immediately. Also, if my hard disk dies, and I have all my important stuff in dropbox, then I just need to reinstall my system and then dropbox, and they all download again. Neat :)

 

You can also login from any web browser and access your documents - download them if you need to.

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I use a small console program written by Manfred Haertel called 'showmail'. It displays the number of emails on a pop server and for each mail sender, subject, sending date and size. Then it optionally asks you if you want to delete this message directly on the server. I use it everyday for the dev mailing lists I'm on.

 

showmail

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My Linux usage has many different facets, leading to many small tools:

 

I use Zenity a lot in scripts. In particular, URL/LNK handlers to work in a Windows network.

I use dot (from graphviz) in scripts to create graphs from various input data (eg: MPD files).

Mathopd is a helpful, very configurable, light-weight web server; I prefer it over lighttpd.

Retroshare is a great tool for easily setting up a server-less messenger among your team.

screen and tilda are must-have for terminal addicts like myself :)

Unison is not known a lot, yet very powerfull: it's a two-way, GUI/CLI, rsync.

Rox is much lighter and faster than Nautilus, and very configurable.

bc as a calculator (bc -lq) is great: why point and click on-screen digit buttons, when you can have history and variables, and your keybord already has digit keys anyway?

Geany is a nice, modern, small, little-known editor in the vein of nedit.

Nedit and links-hacked are invaluable for remote editing/browsing, when you have little RAM/CPU/bandwidth.

For language learning, my favourite tool is Mnemosyne.

For quick but not so dirty scripting, wxGlade is a world better than plain bash+zenity.

Ajaxterm and sslh are nice additions to your own server if you have one.

 

Yves.

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My Linux usage has many different facets, leading to many small tools:

 

I use Zenity a lot in scripts. In particular, URL/LNK handlers to work in a Windows network.

I use dot (from graphviz) in scripts to create graphs from various input data (eg: MPD files).

Mathopd is a helpful, very configurable, light-weight web server; I prefer it over lighttpd.

Retroshare is a great tool for easily setting up a server-less messenger among your team.

screen and tilda are must-have for terminal addicts like myself :)

Unison is not known a lot, yet very powerfull: it's a two-way, GUI/CLI, rsync.

Rox is much lighter and faster than Nautilus, and very configurable.

bc as a calculator (bc -lq) is great: why point and click on-screen digit buttons, when you can have history and variables, and your keybord already has digit keys anyway?

Geany is a nice, modern, small, little-known editor in the vein of nedit.

Nedit and links-hacked are invaluable for remote editing/browsing, when you have little RAM/CPU/bandwidth.

For language learning, my favourite tool is Mnemosyne.

For quick but not so dirty scripting, wxGlade is a world better than plain bash+zenity.

Ajaxterm and sslh are nice additions to your own server if you have one.

 

Yves.

Quite a list there :)  I'll be sure to check some of these out.

 

I proclaim theYinYeti the small apps junkie (if there are no other contenders) :D

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Thank you Nexus :D

 

If you like my little list, you'll be interested to know that “ajaxterm†isn't maintained any more (I learnt that yesterday), and Shell In A Box would be a good replacement.

 

Yves.

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I cannot live without nano for doing all the little text-editing on my system-files. Then I also prefer good ol' xchat to all the modern communication apps (like pidgin, etc.). The aforementiones Rox-filer is also a great tool.

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I cannot live without nano for doing all the little text-editing on my system-files.

Yes, a nice alternative to using 'vi' which is overkill for the simple amounts of config editing that I do.  I used to use JOE mostly prior to using nano.  I had issues with it when editing on remote systems via ssh.

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I got started on nano when installing Gentoo :)

 

Someone asked me the other day do I use vi. I said yes, sometimes :) I like vi if I need to delete a lot of lines.

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