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Canonical and Linspire Announce Technology Partner

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Well said.

 

I played in ubuntu for a couple months again, and it just left not such a good taste for me, just different things I didn't like. Whilst I'm not a big fan of the way they did sudo, that wasn't my biggest problem.

 

Heck, I'm getting bored with everything again, so I went back to Gentoo a few weeks ago on my 2 main box's. Easier to play with more options ;)

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Well said.

 

I played in ubuntu for a couple months again, and it just left not such a good taste for me, just different things I didn't like. Whilst I'm not a big fan of the way they did sudo, that wasn't my biggest problem.

 

Heck, I'm getting bored with everything again, so I went back to Gentoo a few weeks ago on my 2 main box's. Easier to play with more options ;)

Yeah, in the end I wasn't happy with the sudo stuff but it wasn't so mucvh the actual sudo that left a bad taste but the fact when I treid to take it out lots of the packages had it built in...

 

It seems to me to be the mother of the customisations... or at least have driven them as they had small mods to work through sudo ... but with each release the modifications have piled up ...

 

I felt kinda similar about Suse when I tried deinstalling YaST... Well I messed it up then though heck I don't want it anyway... but its so deeply embedded it seemed easier to start from slackware and make a new one. I don't think Ubuntu is that far yet... but I think it takes an extra step every release...

 

I think its more the direction its heading bothers me than any specific...?

CNR being one example? Though of course they might just use the technology without the credit card part but then I see no advantage over synaptic??? So Im back where I started??

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Blasphamy! :P

 

 

 

Noone know what Canonical wants to use the CNR to (yet). The logical way will be rebuild/change CNR to replace the already easy add/remove application to Ubuntu standard.

 

As I understand it from Kervin (he explained CNR's advantages on the forum board) that Companies can ask CNR to make their software available for linux, then CNR converts the software to packages to fit the Distro that support CNR. This will make it more attactive for software companies to make software programs for linux without thinking of the diffrences distros and system setups. That's one of the big advantage will have.

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Noone know what Canonical wants to use the CNR to (yet). The logical way will be rebuild/change CNR to replace the already easy add/remove application to Ubuntu standard.

 

As I understand it from Kervin (he explained CNR's advantages on the forum board) that Companies can ask CNR to make their software available for linux, then CNR converts the software to packages to fit the Distro that support CNR. This will make it more attactive for software companies to make software programs for linux without thinking of the diffrences distros and system setups. That's one of the big advantage will have.

Ok, fair point....

I was somewhat puzzled by what Canonical/Ubuntu would actually gain from this technically...

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Well, since a few weeks, I listen to The Linux Action show regularly, and this was covered in episode 34 (the most recent one). There they had the same doubt and gave a couple of reasons:

"- The Linspire guys are really good at some of the things they do... e.g power management

...

- Linspire also does a lot of polish on their desktop (usuability, bling bling), so Ubuntu can benefit from that as well"

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Woodford's comments suggest that Ubuntu is eclipsing Debian. "I think Mark has done a masterful job of nudging the community into a more pragmatic point of view. More and more the Debian community is becoming the Ubuntu community. New people coming in are allowed to have diverse opinions about open source software. The hardcore purists are sticking with Debian, but five years from now, they may be about as plentiful as 1970s MIT hackers."

 

Wow, talk about a great definition of the types of parasite.

Ubuntu is a parasitic distro to start with but it is at least the type of parasite that tries to preserve its host, or at least tries not to cause it direct harm.

MEPIS has just dropped to a new low... its now become a parasite feeding off another parasite while actively trying to kill off the host of its own host.

 

Ubuntu is .... its here and lots of people like it... if its hurting Debian its through malnourishment and it somewhat believes that its excrement somehow provides nourishment for Debian. It doesn't but at least Shuttleworth always makes an effort, even if it is ill received.

 

Woodford seems rather gleeful at Debians predicted demise, so much so he wants to help it along as fast as possible. Poor guy, he must have been told where to shove it from the Debian devs one to many times for his ego.

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