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Tuxiscool

Mounting Problem

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I have just bought some new ram recently. And since i have installed it i haven't been able to mount my dvd-rom drive,cd-writer or my floppy drive. When i try to mount it it says that there is a segmentation fault. I do not really want to get rid of my new memory, what should i do?

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Why don't you post some more info to help use figure it out. Such as what memory you had and what you added, version of Mandrake you are using, anything you can think off, when the seg fault appears?

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ok, i had 128MB PC100 SDRAM and i added 256 MB PC133 SDRAM and i am using mandrake 9.0. when i type in mount /mnt/cdrom it says that there is a segmentation fault. if i try to acess it through konqueror all my user acounts (including root) dont have the access rights

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Here is a guess, but when mixing the speed of sdram, always make the board bus at the slowest speed. If you are using the primary ram slot with the 133's, the board may be auto clocking to that speed, which will cause the 100 to really mess up. In other words, run the ram as if it were all 100's.

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The next step is to check the new ram. If you don't have a program to check the ram, pull the new stick and see if the problem goes away. There is really a lot of bad ram on the market. Simply adding ram should not cause any issues with Mandrake.

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Guest ndeb
My FSB speed is 100Mhz so there should be no problem with that.
FSB speed and memory speed are two different quantities. For example, in my case I have an FSB speed of 100MHz (actually 200MHz due too DDR) but memory runs at 133MHz. Your BIOS should have an option for adjusting the RAM speed. Make sure the RAM speed is set to 100MHz. See if that helps.

 

If not, try using only the PC133 module in the memory slot closest to the CPU/northbridge and see if that helps. Motherboard instability due to memory modules in multiple slots is known to happen.

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FSB speed and memory speed are two different quantities. For example, in my case I have an FSB speed of 100MHz (actually 200MHz due too DDR) but memory runs at 133MHz

 

DDR does not increase FSB speed it increases memory speed so your memory should be working at 266Mhz but the FSB is downclocking it to 100Mhz

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This is a long shot but I had trouble installing memory on my motherboard when I tried to increase the memory after having the motherboard for about 2.5 years. The bios, however, did all the complaining. It turns out that the memory connectors were the problem. I figured out that the memory wasn't making proper contact with the socket. If you gently wiggle the memory back and forth in a front to back motion (with the power off of course) and listen you may hear some crackling noise. This is caused by the little metal fingers of the connector popping into place. Wiggle until you don't hear anymore crackling. Then turn on your computer to see if the problem went away.

 

Glitz.

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Wiggle gently. Broken solders are a real bear to repair. Better yet, if the contact is not good, simply pull the stick and reinsert it several times. It is safer than damaging the ram slot.

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There are several pins associated with the ram slot or socket. It is possible for a partial connection to get past the bios and not manifest until actual usage, at which time memory errors begin to show up. I think most of us are so far following that line of reasoning.

CPU's, video cards, modems, NIC's, all can behave oddly by not being seated correctly in their slots. Certain pins are used for ID in boot up, so it is possible for a computer to boot and try to run, even though the items are not installed correctly.

 

Try it out; if I had it on the bench, that's what I would do: verify the components seated properly in their spots.

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Guest ndeb
DDR does not increase FSB speed it increases memory speed so your memory should be working at 266Mhz but the FSB is downclocking it to 100Mhz

DDR is not memory specific. It simply means two samples per clock cycle. My memory is PC133 SDRAM (not DDR RAM) running at 133MHz. And FSB speed is 100MHz and DDR which makes it effectively 200MHz. The proof is in the dmesg output lines:

..... CPU clock speed is 751.3415 MHz.

..... host bus clock speed is 200.3577 MHz.

cpu: 0, clocks: 2003577, slice: 1001788

CPU0<T0:2003568,T1:1001776,D:4,S:1001788,C:2003577>

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