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Johnny Ljunggren

Routing 192.168.0.0/16 net

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Hello

 

Is it possible to route C nets?

 

I'm trying to get the IT department to add some routes so that our lab machines get access to a server in another network segment. However they are refusing and telling me they need to add routes for this one by one, and find it to be too much work. I want all networks 192.168.X.0 where X is 100-254 to go one way and the others to go wherever they need.

 

Are they right that C nets cannot be routed like

ip route 192.168.2.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.254

ip route 192.168.0.0 255.255.0.0 192.168.1.253

 

or something to that effect?

 

regards

Johnny

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Of course you can route the whole subnet, the problem might be that they might already be using the same IP range, and maybe is why they suggested doing it by host, rather than the whole subnet.

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I know it is possible to route the whole net. And it is correct that parts of the ip range is already in use, that is why I added the 192.168.2.0 route in the example.

There are only a few networks in use alread, and they are all below 192.168.100.0.

 

More schematic:

 

<IT servers> <-----> <IT Cloud> <----> <IT Switch> <-------> LAB Switch <------> LAB machines

 

I want the lab machines (192.168.100+ ) to access a couple of IT servers. LAB machines have default gw through LAB switch. LAB switch has default gw through IT Switch. The IT Switch connects to the IT servers through the IT cloud - which consists of any numbers of routers/routing switches.

 

My idea was to set gw on all the different IT switches so that traffic end up at the lab switch, unless specifically routed elsewhere on any of the switches.

 

Hmmm, not sure if this made things any clearer though :)

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Not really any clearer :)

 

But yes, if some of the subnets are in use on the other side, this will be why they want to add them at host level, and not by the whole subnet and it is a bit of work, but not that much depending on number of hosts, etc, and where they have to put the routes - typically probably just one router.

 

Unless they are layer 3 switches, it won't matter in changing the gateway on the switches. They won't be doing any routing for you.

 

You could always try if you have a spare machine with two network cards, making your own router and put it between your lab switch and IT switch so that the lab machines can access the IT server that you need. Just an idea, it might solve the problem without having to involve the IT department. Then you can control all the routes yourself from your lab :)

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