Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
maparus

Ethernet, RJ-45 port, crossover cable

Recommended Posts

My old HPPavilian 512 has a plug-in on the back panel that says Ethernet. My new computer I built has a simular plug-in on the back panel that says RJ-45 Port. Are they the same thing? Is this where the crossover cable plugs in to transfur files from one computer to the other. My old computer is a Celeron with Windows XP and my new one is a Sempron with Mandriva 2006. Will that cause a problem? What else do I need to connect the two computers?

 

Many thanks maparus

 

Asus K8V-X mobo

Creative SB Live

Creative 5-1 speakers

Seagate 80g hd

Crucial 512Mb Pc3200 ram

Powmax 400watt ps

Nec nd 3550A Dvd

Geforce Fx 5500 256mb

Sempron 2800 64 bit

Mandriva 2006 32 bit

SupraExpress 56e pro modem

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yes, you are correct, you can use crossover cable for that.. you just have to assign then an ip address on both box for them to see...

.

then try to disable firewall on both so nothing will be block

.

then about tranfering of files, you need to enable file sharing on any of the machine..

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for the information Can you walk me through as to how I assign an ip address to each machine and explan about how to enable file sharing?

 

thanks maparus

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The most easiest way is System/Configuration/Configure Your Computer. You can then go into networking, and go add a connection, choose LAN, and then allocate a static ip address with the correct subnet mask. Each machine will need to have a similar number, the subnet mask will always be the same.

 

You can just enable file sharing on Windows XP, and then use the samba faq in the faq section and then the networking posts to get you working with this. If you want Windows to see files on the Linux box, you also use samba for this, so you can follow this faq and you should be fine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was able to follow you until I got here (and then allocate a static ip address with the correct subnet mask.) I don't know what this means. I did come to a place called DHCP host name.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

OK, a static ip is easy. You can use these two examples for both of your machines:

 

192.168.0.2 - Linux machine

192.168.0.3 - Windows machine

 

Subnet mask - 255.255.255.0 (same for both machines)

 

and then see if you can see each other by opening a command prompt on either machine and:

 

ping 192.168.0.2

 

to ping the linux machine from windows and:

 

ping 192.168.0.3

 

to ping the windows machine from linux. Make sure the Windows firewall is turned off if it's enabled, and also shorewall on linux if you enabled this too.

 

su (enter root password when prompted)
service shorewall stop

 

with Windows, you have to go into network properties for the ethernet connection, and advanced tab I think to turn off the firewall. Unless you use another firewall, then disable in there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You do not need to use a crossover cable as such, straight ethernet cable will also work, so long as one of the ethernet cards is newer than about three years, it will work out the pin allocation on the cable.

 

If you are sharing an Internet between the two computers, then it would be easiest to setup Internet conenction sharing on the machine with the connection and then dynamically (automatically) get an IP Address for the other machine.

 

Otherwise, if you have a router (and I reccommend buying one if you don't) then you can plug both machines into the router and receive dynamic addresses for both.

 

I would also reccommend that you disable firewalls on both machines (Windows has a built-in firewall) while setting up the connection, and then turn them on again when you're done. Windows firewall is notorious for blocking network connections, even where it obviously shouldn't.

 

As for the step-by-step, practical way of doing this, there are many websites around that can help (Google is your friend) and we're here to answer your questions along the way ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
OK, a static ip is easy. You can use these two examples for both of your machines:

...

 

Thank you this I can understand

 

Many thanks maparus

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I couldn't see how to change the ip address of ny Windows XP puter so I left it at 192.168.2.253. I then assigned my Linux puter with 192.168.2.1.

I pinged my Linux puter from my Windows XP puter and recieved the following

Pinging 192.168.2.1 with 32 bytes of data:

Reply from 192.168.2.1 : bytes =32 Time <ims TTL =64

Reply from 192.168.2.1 : bytes =32 Time <ims TTL =64

Reply from 192.168.2.1 : bytes =32 Time <ims TTL =64

Reply from 192.168.2.1 : bytes =32 Time <ims TTL =64

Ping statistics for 192.168.2.1:

Packets: sent =4, Recieved =4, Lost =0 =<0% loss>

Approximate round trip times im milli-seconds:

Min. =0ms Max. =oms, average =0ms

 

I then pinged my Windows XP puter from my Linux puter and recieved

 

Password:

[root@margie maparus]# ping 192.168.2.253

PING 192.168.2.253 (192.168.2.253) 56(84) bytes of data.

64 bytes from 192.168.2.253: icmp_seq=1 ttl=128 time=0.104 ms

64 bytes from 192.168.2.253: icmp_seq=2 ttl=128 time=0.074 ms

64 bytes from 192.168.2.253: icmp_seq=3 ttl=128 time=0.072 ms

64 bytes from 192.168.2.253: icmp_seq=4 ttl=128 time=0.099 ms

64 bytes from 192.168.2.253: icmp_seq=5 ttl=128 time=0.099 ms

64 bytes from 192.168.2.253: icmp_seq=6 ttl=128 time=0.097 ms

64 bytes from 192.168.2.253: icmp_seq=7 ttl=128 time=0.099 ms

64 bytes from 192.168.2.253: icmp_seq=8 ttl=128 time=0.099 ms

64 bytes from 192.168.2.253: icmp_seq=9 ttl=128 time=0.074 ms

64 bytes from 192.168.2.253: icmp_seq=10 ttl=128 time=0.097 ms

64 bytes from 192.168.2.253: icmp_seq=11 ttl=128 time=0.072 ms

64 bytes from 192.168.2.253: icmp_seq=12 ttl=128 time=0.071 ms

64 bytes from 192.168.2.253: icmp_seq=13 ttl=128 time=0.072 ms

64 bytes from 192.168.2.253: icmp_seq=14 ttl=128 time=0.072 ms

64 bytes from 192.168.2.253: icmp_seq=15 ttl=128 time=0.099 ms

64 bytes from 192.168.2.253: icmp_seq=16 ttl=128 time=0.075 ms

64 bytes from 192.168.2.253: icmp_seq=17 ttl=128 time=0.086 ms

64 bytes from 192.168.2.253: icmp_seq=18 ttl=128 time=0.098 ms

64 bytes from 192.168.2.253: icmp_seq=19 ttl=128 time=0.086 ms

64 bytes from 192.168.2.253: icmp_seq=20 ttl=128 time=0.100 ms

 

What does all this mean. Do I have it set up correctly?

 

Many thanks maparus

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, it's working. They replied, so that's good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...