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Guest nocs_13

Can't see ntfs partitions

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Guest nocs_13

i have install mandriva 2010.

but have one problem....

int /dev i have /dev/sda and /dev/sda6-where installed linux....

but in /dev/ not exist /dev/sda1 and /dev/sda5 where in ntfs partitions....

when i try to mount, of cource i get error message about not existing of devices:

 

i have such kind of problem at first.....

can anyone help me?

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I'm not fantastic at this sort of thing, but post the output of 'mount' in a terminal. This should give the guys here a bit of an idea what's going on.

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The partitions should still exist if the disk partitions weren't deleted and formatted, so an easy way would be do this from a console and copy and paste the output here:

 

su (enter root password when prompted)
fdisk -l

 

that is an lowercase L. This will list all the partitions on your disk, and so if /dev/sda1 exists, it should be here, and listed. If not, then I would say that when Mandriva was installed, the disk was erased and used just for Mandriva.

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Guest nocs_13

[root@localhost dev]# fdisk -l

 

Disk /dev/sda: 320.1 GB, 320071851520 bytes

255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 38913 cylinders

Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

Disk identifier: 0x000778b8

 

Device Boot Start End Blocks Id System

/dev/sda1 * 1 13060 104904418+ 7 HPFS/NTFS

/dev/sda2 13061 38913 207664222+ f W95 Ext'd (LBA)

/dev/sda5 13061 26120 104904418+ 7 HPFS/NTFS

/dev/sda6 26121 38913 102759741 83 Linux

[root@localhost dev]# mount -t ntfs /dev/sda1 /media/win_c

mount: special device /dev/sda1 does not exist

[root@localhost dev]# ls /dev

adsp disk/ initctl| lp0 null ram1 ram8 sg0 tty tty2 tty31 tty43 tty55 ttyS0 vcs6 vcsa7

audio dsp input/ lp1 nvidia0 ram10 ram9 sg1 tty0 tty20 tty32 tty44 tty56 ttyS1 vcs7 vcsa8

block/ dvd@ kmem lp2 nvidiactl ram11 random sg2 tty1 tty21 tty33 tty45 tty57 ttyS2 vcs8 vcsa9

bsg/ dvd1@ kmsg lp3 oldmem ram12 rawctl shm/ tty10 tty22 tty34 tty46 tty58 ttyS3 vcs9 watchdog

bus/ dvdrw1@ log= mapper/ parport0 ram13 root snapshot tty11 tty23 tty35 tty47 tty59 urandom vcsa zero

cdrom@ fb@ loop0 mcelog pktcdvd/ ram14 rtc@ snd/ tty12 tty24 tty36 tty48 tty6 vcs vcsa1

cdrom1@ fb0 loop1 mem port ram15 rtc0 sr0 tty13 tty25 tty37 tty49 tty60 vcs1 vcsa10

cdrw1@ fd@ loop2 mice ppp ram2 scd0@ sr1 tty14 tty26 tty38 tty5 tty61 vcs10 vcsa12

char/ fd0 loop3 mixer psaux ram3 scd1@ st0 tty15 tty27 tty39 tty50 tty62 vcs12 vcsa2

console fd1 loop4 mouse0 ptmx ram4 sda st1 tty16 tty28 tty4 tty51 tty63 vcs2 vcsa3

core@ full loop5 net/ pts/ ram5 sda6 stderr@ tty17 tty29 tty40 tty52 tty7 vcs3 vcsa4

cpu/ fuse loop6 network_latency ram@ ram6 sequencer stdin@ tty18 tty3 tty41 tty53 tty8 vcs4 vcsa5

cpu_dma_latency hpet loop7 network_throughput ram0 ram7 sequencer2 stdout@ tty19 tty30 tty42 tty54 tty9 vcs5 vcsa6

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Fdisk clearly shows that sda1 and sda5 are being picked up by the system. Please also post the output of:

 

$ cat /proc/partitions

 

If sda1 and sda5 are not listed in the above(likely), you can manually create the device files for them in /dev using the mknod command. To test for sda1 run as root:

 

# mknod /dev/sda1 b 8 1

 

If mknod runs without error and creates /dev/sda1, try mounting it and see if it works.

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Guest nocs_13

Fdisk clearly shows that sda1 and sda5 are being picked up by the system. Please also post the output of:

 

$ cat /proc/partitions

 

If sda1 and sda5 are not listed in the above(likely), you can manually create the device files for them in /dev using the mknod command. To test for sda1 run as root:

 

# mknod /dev/sda1 b 8 1

 

If mknod runs without error and creates /dev/sda1, try mounting it and see if it works.

 

 

Thank you....

I'll try now

 

 

[goga@localhost ~]$ cat /proc/partitions

major minor #blocks name

 

8 0 312570167 sda

8 6 102759741 sda6

[root@localhost goga]# mknod /dev/sda1 b 8 1

[root@localhost goga]# mount -t ntfs-3g /dev/sda1 /media/win_c

Error opening '/dev/sda1': No such device or address

Failed to mount '/dev/sda1': No such device or address

Either the device is missing or it's powered down, or you have

SoftRAID hardware and must use an activated, different device under

/dev/mapper/, (e.g. /dev/mapper/nvidia_eahaabcc1) to mount NTFS.

Please see the 'dmraid' documentation for help.

 

mknod have create /dev/sda1

Edited by nocs_13

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Try mounting with just ntfs instead of ntfs-3g:

 

# mount -t ntfs /dev/sda1 <mount point>

 

Also, check if sda1 shows up with cat /proc/partitions after running mknod.

Finally, is sda1 shown in Mandriva Control Center > Disks? If so, is any further information given about sda1? Is this a standard ntfs windows partition, i.e. not a Windows Dynamic Disk?

Edited by pmpatrick

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Guest nocs_13

mknod finish without errors but sda1 not exist in /proc/partitions

 

about windows standart partition... i think partition is standart.

i have installed opensuse 10.2 - 11.1, ubuntu 8 and never have such problems.

they saw my disk normally

 

about mcc>disks: this program exit abnormally

Edited by nocs_13

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I'm beginning to wonder about the health of that hard drive; that's pretty odd behavior. If you have adequate external storage, I recommend backing up your data now. Also, go to the the hard drive manufacturer's website and download their hard drive diagnostic utilities iso; all the major hard drive manufacturers have them for free. Run the diagnostic utility in thorough mode and see if any problems are detected.

 

Other things I would try - boot with any linux livecd and see if you have any problems picking up sda1; boot up mandriva and immediately after booting up run:

 

$ dmesg | grep sda*

 

That will print out all the kernel messages relating to sda. See if any I/O or read/access errors are reported. Those types of messages can mean a hard drive that is starting to fail.

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The other thing I thought of, since the MCC was crashing is whether the integrity of the packages installed are OK, or whether they are slightly damaged because of a bad ISO burn, or a bad MD5 sum. But, as pmpatrick says, check that disk first, but also boot some LIVECD and see if it works any better at accessing your disk. Ubuntu LiveCD is generally pretty good without major problems.

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