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mittfh

Viewing security.log in Log File Viewer?

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Here's a nice quick query:

 

Is it possible to get security.log to display in the log file viewer?

 

It appears to be readable only by root, so unsurprisingly log viewer (running with 'ordinary' user permissions) won't touch it.

 

I could open a terminal, then open it via sudo, but it would be nice to have a more user friendly way of taking a peek after the daily MSEC check :)

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Well, this log ***SHOULD*** be readable by root, only.

Anyway, KDE4 has KSystemLog (part of kdeadmin) to view all systam logs, but again you have to use either kdesu, or (if installed) kdesudo to access these logs.

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You could add yourself to the 'adm' group. This group was intended so that members of it could view the system logs without being root; by default some (not all) logs in /var/log have adm as group. Obviously having access comes with responsibility, so you might as well do the occasional sudo if needed.

Edited by pindakoe

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You could add yourself to the 'adm' group. This group was intended so that members of it could view the system logs without being root; by default some (not all) logs in /var/log have adm as group. Obviously having access comes with responsibility, so you might as well do the occasional sudo if needed.

 

So if I grabbed hold of a Gnome graphical sudo interface thingy, could I use that to launch to log file viewer with root permissions?

 

My machine is single (human) user, but it's nice to have a modicum of security - both for prevent me accidentally trashing the system and for the unlikely event of me having visitors around long enough to allow them to play around with my computer, in which case I'd set them up with a (heavily restricted) account.

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Yes you can, but it will require editing /etc/sudoers to grant you permission to access the log-files. I cannot claim that I understood this file's syntax well (even though I learnd programming in a time when no book/course went without BNF-definition of the language, so you'll best google and/or man sudoerds to learn.

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If you're using Gnome, just install the gksu package. You shouldn't have to use sudo, unless you want to.

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