Jump to content
  • Announcements

    • spinynorman

      Mandriva Official Documentation

      Official documentation for extant versions of Mandriva can be found at doc.mandriva.com.   Documentation for the latest release may take some time to appear there. You can install all the manuals from the main repository if you have Mandriva installed - files are prefixed mandriva-doc.
    • paul

      Forum software upgrade   10/29/17

      So you may have noticed the forum software has upgraded !!!
      A few things that have changed. We no longer have community blogs (was never really used) We no longer have a portal page.
      We can discuss this, and decide whether it is needed (It costs money) See this thread: Here
Sign in to follow this  
MottS

IM-06: read and write permission on Windows partition

Recommended Posts

Browse: [About the FAQ Forum] [Table of Contents] [FAQs] [Contribute] [IM: Installing and Configuring Mandrake]

 

IM-06: read and write permission on Windows partition

 

As you probably know, there are two filesystems commonly used on Windows: Fat32 and NTFS. The first part of this FAQ covers Fat32 problems only. See the second part for information on NTFS support.

 

I use VI to edit files via the command lines. HERE is what you have to know about VI.

 

Open a console, login as root and edit /etc/fstab. Look at the line where your Windows filesystem is. That should be something like this

/dev/hda5  /mnt/win_c  vfat  defaults  0 0

Now modify the above line so that it look like this one (ie, add umask=0,quiet after defaults)

/dev/hda5  /mnt/win_c  vfat  defaults,umask=0,quiet  0 0

Now save and quit the file. Finally, remount (umount and mount the partition) by typing

umount /mnt/win_c

mount /mnt/win_c

If you get umount: /mnt/win_c: device is busy, check at XMMS or Konqueror. Something is within /mnt/win_c and prevents you to umount the partition[1]. If that worked, you should now have read and write access by all users.

 

Note that you can organise your /etc/fstab file so that it look like THIS one (user Cannonfodder). You can put spaces between each line. The ONLY thing that matters is the order of things within one line. The order is

 

# <fs> <mountpoint> <type> <opts> <dump> <fsck>

 

Look at 'man mount' and 'man fstab' for further details about that.

 

Reference:

man mount

man fstab

 

[1] More info about solving that particular problem at: 'IM-07: Umount says "device is busy"'

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Browse: [About the FAQ Forum] [Table of Contents] [FAQs] [Contribute] [IM: Installing and Configuring Mandrake]

 

IM-06: read and write permission on Windows partition

----------

Accessing your NTFS Partition on your computer

 

Windows NTFS support is available for Mandrake users. However, due to constant undocumented changes to the NTFS file system, this support is read-only. This means that you may access your files on your NTFS partition, but may not modify files or folders.

 

Here is how to obain access to your NTFS partition.

 

1. Open a console,

2. Type su to login to root as superuser.

3. Edit the file /etc/fstab.

4. Look for the entry related to your NTFS partition. If you do not have this line, you may create one.

 

The entry should look like this:

 

/dev/hda1  /mnt/win_c ntfs defaults,umask=0 0 0

 

If you do not know the location of your NTFS partition, you can open a second console, su to root, and type diskdrake. Look for your NTFS partition and note the device name. E.g. hda1.

 

5. Save the file and quit.

6. Now go to your mount point. In the entry above, it is /mnt/win_c. This is where you would access your files. If you do not have the mount point, then you will need to createit using the mkdir command.

7. When ready, type

 

mount -a

 

This command will insure that all entries in the /etc/fstab are mounted. Go to your mount point and verify that you can see your NTFS files.

 

If you would like to make changes to your files on a NTFS partition, you can do one of the following:

 

1. Convert your NTFS to FAT32.

2. Make another partition and format it as FAT32. Use this partition to transfer files. This still means you can not change your NTFS partition files.

 

Reference:

man mount

man fstab

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

×