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dude67

File Transfer - size limit? [solved]

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Is there a limit of 4 GB when transferring files from one linux machine to another? I have been unable to transfer a video file from one PC to the other, but only with this one particular file. The size of the file is 4.3 GB and the file transfer always stops at 4.0 GB.

 

Then again, I've tried to transfer the file from the one linux machine to a USB 2.0 HardDrive, but the same applies: When the file transfer is almost done at 4.0 GB, it stops and there is this message:

The process for the file protocol died unexpectedly.

Is the file somehow corrupted or is this some type of built-in limitation to file transfer?

 

Sorry, if this seems like total newbie question, but I've never seen this happen before...

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Thanks Spinynorman.

 

I've done some studying and tried to pack the original file, but archiving failed for some reason. I'm DL'ing the same file again from my PVR to see if the file is somehow corrupted and the new file would be OK.

 

But to my original question: does filetransfer set a limit to the file size? The transfer always ends when the file size reaches 4.0 GB...

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Samba does have this limit, nfs does not. I think there is a workaround for Samba, but up to date I never needed it, and I do not know which it is.

Regarding the USB drive, if its FAT32 formatted then 4GB is again the limit for filesize, under any OS, not just Linux. The drive must be formatted at a native Linux format to be able to handle files that big (or NTFS, which isn't writable under Linux in a regular way).

Edited by scarecrow

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OK, that makes sense. I did nfs the file between Linux PCs, but I believe my USB2 HDs are formatted to FAT32 (a long time ago I had a dual boot with winXP/Win98SE...).

 

I have DL'ed the file into my native Linux share of HD, but I needed to transfer that file into a drive I can access with WinXP and I guess both my external HDs are formatted to FAT32 (I should check the other one - just in case it's NTFS). The reason I must do work under WinXP is that I need to demux, mux and compile it into a DVD file before burnign it to a DVD. I guess I could do most of the work under Linux, but the DVD authoring programme is in winXP and it doesn't operate under Linux.

 

I will split the file in two before the transfer to see if that works. Will report back - perhaps tomorrow.

 

Thanks scarecrow!

Edited by dude67

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FAT32 has a file size limit of around 4.3GB. I tried moving a Debian DVD image to a FAT32 disk once, and it gave me an error saying the disk was full, even when 10GB was free.

 

You have to use NTFS for files greater than 4GB or under Linux any of the partitions should be fine for this size. I move files around with FTP.

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I move files around with FTP.

I meant to say FTP (sftp) in stead of nfs...

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sftp is using ssh from what I remember. Or at least this is how I used it once before.

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OK people, thanks for your help.

 

It now seems FAT32 was the name of my problem. I managed to correct the problem by dividing the original video file in two and transferring the smaller (2,1 and 2,2 Gig) files between the PCs. Then of course putting the files together finally on my other PC.

 

"As I live and learn..."

 

Cheers all!

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