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yr2alex

APT for MDK?

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I don't know what you mean by suggested dependencies, but if you mean that urpmi may indicate that to solve a dependency there are two (or more) possibitlities, and one has/gets to choose, urpmi does that.

Nope in apt for instance you can list and choose to select useful but not needed things.

 

For instance mplayer will suggest extra fonts but it will function perfectly without them. If you choose OO-fr then it will suggest OO-fr-hyphenation, dictionaries etc. as well.

Its a pretty neat feature and more needed in Debian simply because of the shere number of packages compared to MDK.

 

adamw thanks, i don't have a Mandrake to check with but I knew this was somewhere... the problem as I say is finding documentation on it.

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I keep hearing this about the shere number of packages, but what numbers are we talking exactly?

 

I mean, with urpmi I can install more than is useful to me, I seldomly cant find something that I read about on the web or elsewhere, and in those cases it's usually something that just became usable and just hasn't been packaged yet....

 

I made a comparison between SUSE and Mdk once, to find no big differences.

So how many packages are there for Debian? How many GB of software?

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Debian is the biggest, SuSE and MDK are around equal in second place, Fedora is rather a way behind at least so far as official repository goes. I don't know where Slack and Gentoo slot in (they're both probably quite big, at least in the Debian / MDK / SuSE league, I guess Gentoo might be close to Debian). I believe Debian has something in excess of 15,000 packages. I'm at a Windows machine right now (my *other* job) so I can't do this, but pipe this file: http://packages.debian.org/stable/allpackages.en.txt.gz to wc -l and you'll know exactly how many. If you just take the entire list of MDK packages you get something around 12,000, I think, but that's inflated, as we have lots of separate lib packages and we separate -devel packages, neither of which most distros do. If you cut lib and -devel packages out of MDK's list you get something around 8,000. SuSE's numbers are practically identical to MDK's. For FC3, the official repository had around 1,000 packages, but obviously they have a lot in fedora-extras and such. You can crunch all the numbers for yourself with a bit of Googling, urpmq, wc and grep and it'll serve as a nice revision course in console commands. :)

Edited by adamw

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just a quick observation here. adamw, you stated before that

The big thing apt has that urpmi doesn't (that I'm aware of) is suggested dependencies. This would be a lot of work to implement in MDK, though - the problem isn't with writing the functionality into urpmi, but revising all the packages to take advantage of it.
well, it cant be the mdk packages, or apt4rpm in mdk would have the same problem and it doesnt. so we can eliminate the packages. its that simple.

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linux: um, no, apt4rpm can happily *support* suggested dependencies, but my point is that none of the official MDK packages is actually built to *include* any suggested dependencies, and rebuilding all the packages that way would be a lot of work. Or are you saying that, for instance, if you use apt on MDK to install totem, it suggests a bunch of optional but useful gstreamer packages? I'd be rather surprised.

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linux: um, no, apt4rpm can happily *support* suggested dependencies, but my point is that none of the official MDK packages is actually built to *include* any suggested dependencies, and rebuilding all the packages that way would be a lot of work. Or are you saying that, for instance, if you use apt on MDK to install totem, it suggests a bunch of optional but useful gstreamer packages? I'd be rather surprised.

 

 

try it. you just maybe surprised.

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urpmi can install from iso images.

 

I just did an install of mdk10.2rc2 from harddrive without using cdrom or floppy - just add the right things to the lilo or grub bootloader.

 

Then you can point to the installation cd iso directory on your system, which means you can install from that - no need to burn a cd or even have a cdrom or floppy drive.

 

Upon later installation, urpmi will mount the iso images as required to install from.

 

Note: during installation from cd/dvd the user gets the offer to copy everything to harddisk, I'm not sure if this creates an iso, but that would lead to the same result.

 

try it. you just maybe surprised.

Why should he try it? There's no hinting info in mdk rpms. You wouldn't know, you haven't used it recently. Why should adamw waste his time on that?

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If someone thinks that urpmi need some new functions to compete with apt-get, so improve the urpmi.

Before to try MDK with apt-get I will try another distro. I really like synaptic, but I really don't like apt-get. I use MDK and URPMI and prefer to try a distro fully based on Debian like Ubuntu, or go directly to Gentoo before to use MDK with this apt-get guy. :evilmod:

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And the moral of the story is Apt is better, no URPMI is better,no APT, no URPMI, no APT ..... Oh who gives a F.A.Q already!!! Use whatever the F.A.Q. you want, just make sure it is on Linux. As for me... (see the screen shots below)

 

post-6086-1129916625_thumb.jpg

 

 

yr2alex :banana:

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i like playing with package managers. i have used urpmi, apt, yast, red carpet, yum and smart. they all have their good points. heres a little howto i wrote on smart (yes its for suse) http://www.susewiki.org/index.php?title=Smart

 

i do like apt better than urpmi. yast is comparable to the drakerpm. especially now. i can easily add most third party repos. http://www.opensuse.org/Additional_YaST_Package_Repositories

 

smart deffinately has some advantages over the other package managers, but it doesnt handle everything yet. i tried to have some one try it on arch with pacman sources. didnt work. but then my howto goes into that.

 

all i can say is try package managers yourself (if your so inclined). if your happy with what you have.....fine. this isnt a communistic state, where we have a regime holding a gun to your head instisting that you try xyz package manager.

 

i enjoy the choice and the freedom of the choices that are afforded to me.

 

there might be some metrics to determine which package manager is better, but in the end, its the end user that has the final say.

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smart deffinately has some advantages over the other package managers, but it doesnt handle everything yet. i tried to have some one try it on arch with pacman sources. didnt work. but then my howto goes into that.

:lol2:

I'm not surprised. Arch isn't exactly the most popular distro, although it isn't gobolinux or something. I wonder if SMART handles ebuilds...I'd bet it probably does. Or someones hacked it to :D

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