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fuzzylizard

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About fuzzylizard

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    Toronto, Canada
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    Linux, Programming, Web Developement, Java Development
  1. The easiest way to have a dual boot machine between Linux and Windows is to install Windows first and then Linux. However, you install Windows, it is going to overwrite your MBR. If you do not let it, then you are probably not going to be able to install Windows. What you need is a way to boot into Linux after you do the Windows install. This will required a linux boot floppy. Then, install windows, let it overwrite your MBR and make sure that you can boot into it first. Once you have that done, then you should be able to go into Fedora, using the boot floppy, and fix Grub so that it recognizes both Windows and Linux. As far as I know, the order of the disks does not matter if you are installing windows 2000, XP.
  2. Yeah, of course you can use Mandrake without paying. In order to do so, all you have to do is to download the free version. The 10.1 Community Edition is out right now and the Official Edition should be out in a couple of weeks. Both are free to download, install, update, and use.
  3. I updated from 10 to 10.1 using the DVD. It was incredible. I simply put in the DVD and rebooted my computer. Everything from that point on was just like a normal mandrake install. Except that I did not have ot swap disks. Not to state the obvious, but you have to have a DVD rom drive in order for this to work.
  4. Why do you have 3 mounted FAT partitions on a linux computer? Do you still have a windows partition that you can boot into mounted somewhere as well? My guess is that there is probably not any defrag software that will run on linux as it is not a really big need. However, this is an interesting question. I am thinking of putting together a linux server. Part of that server will be a backup drive. If I format this drive ext2,3,or reiserfs and the main drive dies, I am screwed in that I will not be able to take the backup drive and stick it into a windows computer and access the information. However, if I format it for FAT, then I run the risk of it slowing down do to increased fragmentation. However, the drive is connected to a linux computer so the option to defrag it does not exist. I guess I go with ext3 and if the linux machine dies, I use Knoppix to recover the data.
  5. Yep, I agree. In my case, the drive is no longer under warranty so there is no point in trying to return it. In addition, I don't have a floppy drive on the computer that has the drive. I will probably try the manufacturer's tools this weekend on the drive to see just how bad things really are. If the drive is still under warranty, definitely run it through the diagnostic tools first. I have done this with other drives that have failed and it has always helped when it comes to getting them replaced.
  6. Just for an update on my little drive - I downloaded Knoppix and booted the computer using it. This allowed me to do a badblocks check independent of running the kernel. I eventually stopped the check after what looked like several thousand bad blocks scrolled by in the console window. Needless to say, the drive is toast. For anyone else in this situation, a great command for checking your drive is badblocks. It performs a non-destructive read of every block on your drive. If your drive is really bad, you may want to run it from something like Knoppix though. Here is the syntax # /sbin/badblocks -v /dev/hda or whatever drive you want to check
  7. Nope, I haven't done a thing to the system. I was checking my logs for an SSH attack that is currently going around and found the log entries above. I have to agree that the drive is dying.
  8. I am getting the following errors showing up in /var/log/messages about every 5 - 20 seconds and I don't really understand what they mean. Oct 18 21:55:16 Rivendell kernel: hda: read_intr: status=0x59 { DriveReady SeekComplete DataRequest Error } Oct 18 21:55:16 Rivendell kernel: hda: read_intr: error=0x40 { UncorrectableError }, LBAsect=89894191, sector=17039416 Oct 18 21:55:16 Rivendell kernel: end_request: I/O error, dev 03:03 (hda), sector 17039416 Oct 18 21:55:16 Rivendell kernel: EXT3-fs error (device ide0(3,3)): ext3_get_inode_loc: unable to read inode block - inode=1054725, block=2129927 Oct 18 21:55:16 Rivendell kernel: EXT3-fs error (device ide0(3,3)) in ext3_reserve_inode_write: IO failure In addition, I tried to reboot the server and was welcomed with a ton of disk errors. I did a manual fsck and simply selected the defaults when it asked to fix/ignore/save something. This took about an hour to run through. I restarted the computer and everything seemed to be going fine, although I had lost some functionality. This lasted for about 10 minutes. I tried the following command to see if there were any bad blocks on the drive: $ /sbin/badblocks -v /dev/hda This basically killed the drive. The entire computer became inactive. When I tried to switch to another console (ctrl-alt-1, 2,3,4,etc) all I got, on every screen, were the error listed above. I finally had to turn the machine off. My next move is to pull the drive out, put it in another computer and run the Maxtor disk diagnostic tools on. (no floppy drive in the server). Anyone have any idea as to what might be going on here.
  9. In addition, some programs need the JAVA_HOME environment variable to be set before they will work. You may want to add this to your /etc/profile as well. JAVA_HOME=/usr/java/j2re1.4.2_03 export JAVA_HOME Notice that the JAVA_HOME variable does not include the /bin at the end of the path.
  10. One word: jEdit http://www.jedit.org One of the best text editors around with a ton of plugins and it understands C++ (at least in the way of code highlighting, code folding, beautifying, etc).
  11. Yea, the underlying filesystem is irrelavent. The SMB protocol takes care everything. As for getting things to work, can you post your fstab entries, also, is the username and password the same on the mandrake box and the winXP box? Have you done any configuration in samba? or are you just using smbclient?
  12. If you are running Mandrake 9.2 (or any recent version of Mandrake) KDevelop is supplied on the install CD's. You should be able to simply go to the package manager and install it. It will tell you that it needs to install about a hundred different packages to support dependencies, but it should install. As for the actual question, yes you can compile from the command line. Instead of using gcc use g++. Most of the options are the same for gcc and g++. Another suggestion for an IDE is Emacs or VIM. Both are excellent editors with a lot of powerfull features when used for C++ programming. They do take a little getting used to though.
  13. The wireless desktop is about 4 months old (I got it for Christmas), so I am not sure if it is still under warranty or not. I got it from Best Buy, who do not support their products for more than 14 days so I can't take it back to them and since it is from microsoft, I am not sure how that would go either. Plus, I do not have the original packaging anymore. I did a little googling and found a few reports of the same thing happening to people. (Had to go to google groups in order to find the posts) I am not really sure that I would go with a wireless keyboard or mouse anymore. I have noticed the problems with games -- it does make them harder to play. Anyone know of any links/tutorials that show how to mod a wireless keyboard to a wired keyboard?
  14. I can't believe it, my nice shiny (almost) new keyboard has died. I have the Microsoft wireless desktop pro and up till yesterday morning it was working fine. I wake up yesterday and the keyboard refused to work. The first thing I did was to change the batteries, no big deal. Still couldn't get it to work. Fine, try another set of brand new batteries. Still nothing. Maybe the channel that it is using has some interference on it. So I try to sync the keyboard to the receiver -- nothing. A this point I tried ripping the whole thing out and connecting it to another computer to see what would happen, still nothing. As far as I can tell, the thing is dead. RIP my little keyboard. The worse part is that I really liked that keyboard. The next one that I buy will definitely have a cord. No more of this wireless stuff.
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